Wednesday, September 23, 2015

North to Milwaukee

From Burlington, Wisconsin that is. Some more late-night surfing for online tidbits of info on the old Fox River Valley RR led me across this gem of a discovery. Sweet... loads of details on the TM interurban line that ran between both cities - the grade I plan on using for my fictional UP (C&NW) Burlington subdivision.

A couple of pages stand out - here photos of the through girder bridge that carried the line over the White River in Burlington, as well as the diamond crossing with the Soo Line tracks (later WC-CN). Also a couple of pages later shows the orientation of the curve from the bridge onto Congress Street, which then curves towards the northeast to begin the private right-of-way alignment towards Rochester.

Looking over Google Maps the retaining wall in the second photo is still there, now edging the back of a used-car dealership's parking lot and along the Fox River. As is common with many former interurban ROW's a utility line marks the location of the old track alignment in this section. Scrolling to the right shows where the private ROW begins, now a rails-to-trails path.

1 comment:

  1. Hey Dan it's me again. As info the FRV and TMER&L used the same right of way to get to Burlington, but once in the city the TMER&L used a different line. http://content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/maps/id/2127/rec/9
    If you look at that map site where it shows Burlington the right of way for the FRV did not curve to the west along Congress St. and then cross the White River. Instead it continued south-southwest through the city and crossed the Fox River twice as seen on this old 1873 plat map: http://archives.uwp.edu/files/original/79734f85bfb45f6871dc4b2480323f1f.jpg and here is an 1858 plat showing the same thing: http://archives.uwp.edu/files/original/e15463c3f49f5ce26411a9576d4ff5f9.jpg
    Another book you may want to try and track down is one that the Burlington Historical Society(?) did for the city's sesquicentennial in 1985; it has a lot of info about the city's development and early businesses. As always hope this helps.

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